Naruto viewers, if you didn’t pick up this one, now’s your chance. Mendoukusai has been made popular thanks to Shikamaru due to it being his catchphrase. Just like urusai, it’s an Insta-Learn word and you will often hear it throughout various anime. Mendoukusai means bothersome, tiresome or troublesome and refers to an activity.
Surprisingly enough, the kanji used for this adjective make completely no sense why together they make troublesome. The first kanji men 面 means mask, surface or face. In combination with white 白い they form the adjective omoshiroi 面白い meaning funny or interesting. The second kanji is dou 倒, when used as a verb it becomes taosu 倒す meaning to overthrow something. I will discuss this one in more detail in a later Word of the Day. Why overthrowing and mask together make troublesome is rather vague to me.
Some of you might think: “Herpderp! Shikamaru says mendoukusei, not mendoukusai!”. It’s true, but they mean the exact same thing. Just as was the case with urusai, Shikamaru drops the final ‘ai’ and replaces it with ‘ei’. It’s a quite common feature in Japanese with adjectives and causal speech. The main difference between ‘ai’ and ‘ei’ is that the latter is less formal than the first. ‘ei’ is the Kansai Ben counterpart, therefore, use with care.
To conclude, mendoukusai means bothersome. In some contexts it can also mean something along the lines of boring (I will discuss this as well in a later Word of the Day). Naruto has already proven how to use it (although some might argue this due to Shikamaru being such a lazy-ass XD). Use with friends if you don’t feel like doing something.

Naruto viewers, if you didn’t pick up this one, now’s your chance. Mendoukusai has been made popular thanks to Shikamaru due to it being his catchphrase. Just like urusai, it’s an Insta-Learn word and you will often hear it throughout various anime. Mendoukusai means bothersome, tiresome or troublesome and refers to an activity.

Surprisingly enough, the kanji used for this adjective make completely no sense why together they make troublesome. The first kanji men 面 means mask, surface or face. In combination with white 白い they form the adjective omoshiroi 面白い meaning funny or interesting. The second kanji is dou 倒, when used as a verb it becomes taosu 倒す meaning to overthrow something. I will discuss this one in more detail in a later Word of the Day. Why overthrowing and mask together make troublesome is rather vague to me.

Some of you might think: “Herpderp! Shikamaru says mendoukusei, not mendoukusai!”. It’s true, but they mean the exact same thing. Just as was the case with urusai, Shikamaru drops the final ‘ai’ and replaces it with ‘ei’. It’s a quite common feature in Japanese with adjectives and causal speech. The main difference between ‘ai’ and ‘ei’ is that the latter is less formal than the first. ‘ei’ is the Kansai Ben counterpart, therefore, use with care.

To conclude, mendoukusai means bothersome. In some contexts it can also mean something along the lines of boring (I will discuss this as well in a later Word of the Day). Naruto has already proven how to use it (although some might argue this due to Shikamaru being such a lazy-ass XD). Use with friends if you don’t feel like doing something.

Naruto viewers, if you didn’t pick up this one, now’s your chance. Mendoukusai has been made popular thanks to Shikamaru due to it being his catchphrase. Just like urusai, it’s an Insta-Learn word and you will often hear it throughout various anime. Mendoukusai means bothersome, tiresome or troublesome and refers to an activity.
Surprisingly enough, the kanji used for this adjective make completely no sense why together they make troublesome. The first kanji men 面 means mask, surface or face. In combination with white 白い they form the adjective omoshiroi 面白い meaning funny or interesting. The second kanji is dou 倒, when used as a verb it becomes taosu 倒す meaning to overthrow something. I will discuss this one in more detail in a later Word of the Day. Why overthrowing and mask together make troublesome is rather vague to me.
Some of you might think: “Herpderp! Shikamaru says mendoukusei, not mendoukusai!”. It’s true, but they mean the exact same thing. Just as was the case with urusai, Shikamaru drops the final ‘ai’ and replaces it with ‘ei’. It’s a quite common feature in Japanese with adjectives and causal speech. The main difference between ‘ai’ and ‘ei’ is that the latter is less formal than the first. ‘ei’ is the Kansai Ben counterpart, therefore, use with care.
To conclude, mendoukusai means bothersome. In some contexts it can also mean something along the lines of boring (I will discuss this as well in a later Word of the Day). Naruto has already proven how to use it (although some might argue this due to Shikamaru being such a lazy-ass XD). Use with friends if you don’t feel like doing something.

Naruto viewers, if you didn’t pick up this one, now’s your chance. Mendoukusai has been made popular thanks to Shikamaru due to it being his catchphrase. Just like urusai, it’s an Insta-Learn word and you will often hear it throughout various anime. Mendoukusai means bothersome, tiresome or troublesome and refers to an activity.

Surprisingly enough, the kanji used for this adjective make completely no sense why together they make troublesome. The first kanji men 面 means mask, surface or face. In combination with white 白い they form the adjective omoshiroi 面白い meaning funny or interesting. The second kanji is dou 倒, when used as a verb it becomes taosu 倒す meaning to overthrow something. I will discuss this one in more detail in a later Word of the Day. Why overthrowing and mask together make troublesome is rather vague to me.

Some of you might think: “Herpderp! Shikamaru says mendoukusei, not mendoukusai!”. It’s true, but they mean the exact same thing. Just as was the case with urusai, Shikamaru drops the final ‘ai’ and replaces it with ‘ei’. It’s a quite common feature in Japanese with adjectives and causal speech. The main difference between ‘ai’ and ‘ei’ is that the latter is less formal than the first. ‘ei’ is the Kansai Ben counterpart, therefore, use with care.

To conclude, mendoukusai means bothersome. In some contexts it can also mean something along the lines of boring (I will discuss this as well in a later Word of the Day). Naruto has already proven how to use it (although some might argue this due to Shikamaru being such a lazy-ass XD). Use with friends if you don’t feel like doing something.

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Everyday, a little bit of Japanese ^__^

A guide for every picture:

Every picture is divided into 5 parts
-the number of the post in Japanese
-the kanji
-the furigana
-the romanization (Japanese pronunciation)
-the english translation

Under each picture are some comments about the word.

If I make mistakes (which I'm sure there will happen), forgive me. ^^' I've been studying Japanese at uni for almost a year now. If the error I made is so obvious, I shall be forced to punish myself (I will be happy to do so). (or not...)

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